Johns_Hopkins

Teaching and Learning Resources: Digital Literacy Resources

  • Digital Literacy Framework Toolkit from Virginia TechThis toolkit is intended to help you put the digital literacy framework from the University Libraries at Virginia Tech into action. Use this toolkit to align your work with digital literacy learning outcomes, get inspired when revising or creating a workshop, curriculum, program, or other learning experience, and learn more about the digital literacy framework. CC-BY Julia Feerrar and Kelsey Hammer.
  • Digital Literacy Topics from EDUCAUSEExplore digital literacy articles and resources from EDUCAUSE, a community of information technology professionals that aims to support higher education.
  • Digital Tattoo from the University of British ColumbiaThe Digital Tattoo project is a student-led project creating cross-institutional resources and communities to explore digital identity. From the University of British Columbia.
  • Observatory on Social Media (OSM) from Indiana UniversityOSoME unites data scientists and journalists studying the role of media and technology in society, and curbing the spread of misinformation online and the manipulation of social media. They highlight tools, findings, publications, and resources.

Information Literacy Resources

  • AAHSL Health Information Literacy Competency MapThis resource is developed by the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) Competency-Based Medical Education Task Force (2018). It maps the ACRL Information Literacy Frames to the AAMC Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency and the ACGME Core Competency requirements.
  • ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education SandboxFind open lesson plans to incorporate information literacy into your curriculum. From the Association of College and Research Libraries, a division of the American Library Association.
  • ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for NursingThese standards directly address the information skills needed by nursing students at the associate, baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral levels and are written for nursing faculty and librarians who support nursing programs and nursing students in academic settings. However, because many nursing students are also practicing nurses, the skills described in the standards can be used for continuing education in the nursing profession.
  • Information Literacy Resources from EDUCAUSEExplore information literacy articles and resources from EDUCAUSE, a community of information technology professionals that aims to support higher education.

Content retrieved from: https://browse.welch.jhmi.edu/teaching-learning-resources/digital-information-literacy